LiseFinal_Sans_Background

Physics games

2018 Edition

LiseFinal_Sans_Background

Physics games

2018 Edition

What are the physics games?

The eighth edition of Physics games will be held at Polytechnique Montréal from January 12 to 14, 2018. The delegations coming from the programs of physics and engineering physics of Quebec, Ontario and the Maritimes will be invited to join us, the time of a weekend for a friendly competition on the theme of physics.
This initiative was born in Montreal's École Polytechnique in 2011 and is expanding since. Physics and engineering physics students coming to the event will test their knowledge, meet students from the scientific community and of course, try to win the games. During this weekend the participants from various universities will have the opportunity to participate in different activities such as the technical challenge, the theoretical exam, quizzes, sport activities and more. Each of those opportunities will allow participants to challenge fellow students and accumulate points that will be counted to determine the winning team at the final banquet.

Featured Physicist

Featured Physicist

Born in 1878 in Austria to a Jewish family that will encourage her in her education, Lise Meitner has been able to fight prejudices and oppressions against the scientific education of women. She pursued a career in physics and became interested in the radioactive properties of matter with the German chemist Otto Hahn. After participating in the First World War as an X-ray machine operator for the wounded, she continued her research in nuclear physics and discovered the non-radiative transition known as the Auger Effect and several types of radioactive emissions.
She occupies a large part in the discovery of nuclear fission with her colleague Otta Hahn, but she will not be quoted in the publication because of the beginning of the second world war that forced her to flee to Sweden. She pursued her research with Otto while being abroad, but as the race for the armament began, she refused a job in the Manhattan project because she didn't want to help create something such as a nuclear bomb.
In 1944, Otto Hahn received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the discovery of nuclear fission. Named three times for the Nobel Prize, Lise will never receive it despite the esteem worn by her colleagues, but will receive many other major distinctions.